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She Stole My Style in Japan

She Stole My Style in Tokyo

She Stole My Style in Japan

Women wearing kimono on the way to Sensō-ji Shrine in Tokyo.

She Stole My Style in Japan

My love of doors continues! The black, red and gold combo makes my heart beat faster. Sensō-ji Shrine, Tokyo.

She Stole My Style in Japan

At the controversial Yasukuni-jinja Shrine memorializing Japan’s war dead.

She Stole My Style in Japan

The crowded Takeshita-dori street in Harajuku. This street is excellent for street style spotting but don’t expect great shopping – it’s quantity over quality here.

She Stole My Style in Japan

The most important individual in our lives didn’t get a souvenir from Japan. These dog kimonos were really expensive and I thought that I would buy one for less and a later time for Lola but never did…

She Stole My Style in Japan

Denim, graphic tees and glasses in Harajuku.

She Stole My Style in Japan

Twinning! I spotted these women on the long walk up to Meiji-Jingū Shrine. It was extremely hot while were in Japan and I never cease to be amazed at women who look literally cool and chic while I feel like a sweaty mess.

She Stole My Style in Japan

A beautiful handwritten wish at Meiji-Jingū Shrine.

She Stole My Style in Japan

Tokyo is a massive and sprawling city that can feel void of nature. Meiji-Jingū has it in spades.

She Stole My Style in Japan

I have no idea what the name of this store is but I can describe it for you: Eight floors of everything technical, mechanical, battery operated, solar operated you can imagine and other things you can’t. I walked out with what looks like a decorative yellow throw pillow that is also a neck massager. I found the Discman section particularly entertaining.

She Stole My Style in Japan

Jins is a British import to Japan. Selling basic and seemingly good quality glasses and lenses at extremely reasonable prices. Their prices are for the frame AND lenses AT ANY PRESCRIPTION. My mind was blown as we pay way too much for glasses in Canada.

She Stole My Style in Japan

A Tokyo view from the apartment of our friends in Morishita.

She Stole My Style in Japan

Of Lost in Translation fame, it’s Shibuya Crossing. We went fairly early in the morning and missed out on the much larger evening and night crowds.

She Stole My Style in Japan

Train attendants waiting to board our bullet train to Kyoto. My asking to take their photo immediately brought out smiles and laughter.

She Stole My Style in Japan

Akihabara Electric Town.

She Stole My Style in Japan

Designer buttons repurposed as hair elastics.

She Stole My Style in Japan

One tiny piece of Shinjuku. I spent almost an hour trying to find Ali in Shinjuku Station and took this photo while walking to where I thought he was. Only he wasn’t.

She Stole My Style in Japan

While waiting for Ali to find me in Shinjuku, I went in a store and found a top I thought might fit me. (It was not made for my long torso…) It was the first time I had tried something on in Japan which meant it was the first time I saw what is a common sight in fitting rooms – a sign asking you to put a face cover on before you trying something on to prevent your makeup rubbing off. I took a selfie with it on but it is so ridiculous looking that I didn’t include it in this post.

She Stole My Style in Japan

A life-size figure at the Edo-Tokyo Museum.

She Stole My Style in Japan

A peak at fall style in a Japanese store.

She Stole My Style in Japan

Looking up at Tokyo Skytree. We didn’t go up for the simple reason of cost. At ¥4,000 or $50 Canadian dollars, it wasn’t worth it to us to go up.

She Stole My Style in Japan

Japanese taxis blew my mind. The door is controlled by the driver which means they push a button to open and close the door for you. The small plastic shield is supposed to protect the driver but doesn’t do the best job. The seats are covered with starched white lace doilies. It was a lot to take in.

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